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Betting Terminologies

Draw Bias

We’re often asked about the importance of draw bias and we use a lot of this information when making our notebook selections so the following is a summary of what we feel is useful information in making your selections.

Not all UK racecourses have a draw advantage, but some do. Knowing which ones, and in which types of race, can greatly improve your chances of making your horse racing betting more profitable.

A draw bias exists if there is a distinct advantage to horses drawn in certain stall positions. This usually happens if the surface the horses run on is different on one part of the course compared to another.

It can also happen if the shape of the course provides a shorter route to the winning post (such as on the inside of a bend).

All courses should have natural draw biases due to the shape of the circuit. Whether a course is left handed or right handed those drawn closest to the rail should have more of an advantage than those drawn the widest.

The following is a general summary, but there’s a fantastic little site at www.drawbias.com to give you some greater detail and food for thought?

When using draw bias figures, don’t just concentrate on using the figures where the draw is shown to be favourable but also look at unfavourable draws as well.

We often look to see how a horse has performed from a statistically ‘poor draw’ and whether a runner up from a ‘poor draw’ indicates the horse had performed above average and could well win when conditions were right?

Ascot

The straight course at Ascot sees races from 5f through to 1m. In very big fields you occasionally see one side of the course favoured although it can be difficult to predict which side they split.

In medium sized fields, low draws occasionally hold the whip hand and traditionally on soft or heavy ground there used to be a very strong high draw bias on the straight courses, especially in big fields.

However, since the course has reopened in 2006 there have been only a handful of races on such going and hence it is difficult to make any assumptions at this point.

On the round course there seems to be no significant bias.

Ayr

On the straight course at Ayr they vary the position of the stalls, but regardless of stall position, high draws have the advantage. It seems that the bias is slightly stronger when the stalls are placed high as would be expected.

On the round course there is a slight advantage to low draws over 7f, but the bias is traditionally stronger over 1m. Since 2005 14 of the 32 handicaps of 10+ runners over 1m have been won by one of the lowest three draws.

Bath

Over 5f11yds there have been twenty 10+ runner handicaps in the past four seasons of which 10 were won by the top third of the draw. Low draws can go off too quickly and get picked off late by higher drawn horses coming fast and late. Over 5f161yds there seems little in the draw.

On the round course there seems little bias of real significance.

Beverley

The 5f trip at Beverley has long been regarded as arguably the strongest draw bias C&D in the country. High draws have enjoyed a significant advantage for many years. If we look at the result of 10 runner or more handicaps since 2011 we get the following draw split:

Top “third” of the draw: 51.7% (wins), 47.7%(placed)
Middle “third” of the draw: 34.5% (wins), 35.1% (placed)
Bottom “third” of the draw: 13.8% (wins), 17.2%(placed)

Hence the top third of the draw have been roughly four times more likely to win than the bottom third of the draw. The general perception is that the bias is not as strong as it was a few years ago, and although this is probably the case, it is still one of the most potent biases in the country.

Over 7f100yds there is also a high draw bias. In 2008 in 10+ runner handicaps draws 6 or lower managed just 1 win between them in 10 races. Having said that, it is rare for individual races to be totally dominated by high draws.

Over 1m100yds the high draw bias at the turn of the century was very strong, but in recent years the bias has evened out. It now seems a fairly level playing field. It is a similar picture over 1m2f with high draws possibly having the slightest of advantages. Over 1m4f+ there is no draw bias.

Brighton

Low draws are perceived to have the advantage over 5f, but middle to high draws have more than held their own in recent years in fields of 10 or more runners. Too often front-runners go off far too quickly in the first two furlongs and hence tire and get collared late on. It is rare to get genuinely soft ground at Brighton, but if there is jockeys tend to bring their runners near side which can give high draws the advantage.

Over 6f very low draws have had a slight edge in recent years, but it is not significant enough to make money following them. As with 5f races, on genuinely soft ground a high draw bias can occur if the horses come near side.

Over 7f and 1m there is no significant draw bias, and this is also the case at all longer distances at the course.

Carlisle

Over the two sprints there is usually an advantage to higher draws, especially on better ground. An example of this occurred on 16th June 2008 in the Lakeland Willow Water handicap where three of the top four draws filled the first three places. The very highest drawn horse has performed extremely well in the last 4 seasons winning 8 of the 41 handicaps with 10+ runners. Backing all such runners would have produced a profit of £74.00 to £1 level stakes (ROI +180.5%. On soft ground the bias often reverses to low draws as runners tend to tack across to the stands’ rail (low).

At 7f or more there is no apparent draw bias.

Catterick

Very low draws have a decent advantage especially on good or firmer. The 4 lowest draws have provided 17 of the 38 winners in 10+ runner handicaps over the past four years. Indeed, you could have made a profit by simply backing the four lowest draws in every qualifying race. For punters who like the straight forecast bet, then it may be worth considering perming the three lowest draws in 5f handicaps of 10 or more runners. In soft ground the bias can turn around with high draws having an edge, but this has been less apparent more recently.

Over 6f low draws do have an advantage, but recent results show that you can actually win from any part of the draw. Over 7f there is a perceived low draw bias, but one does not actually exist. At 1m4f or more there is no draw bias.

Chepstow

Since 2010 the draw splits thus:

Top “third” of the draw: 21.7%(win), 27.2%(placed)
Middle “third” of the draw: 35%(win), 34.4% (placed)
Bottom “third” of the draw: 43.3%(win), 38.3%(placed)

Hence, it now seems that high draws at are a slight disadvantage. On the round course there is no draw bias.

Chester

The 5f trip has long been one of the strongest draw biases and there is still a strong a significant advantage to low draws. If we look at the result of 10+ handicaps since 2010 we get the following draw split:

Top “third” of the draw: 8.3% (win), 11.1% (placed)
Middle “third” of the draw: 25% (win), 38.9% (placed)
Bottom “third” of the draw: 66.7% (win), 50% (placed)

Over half of the races went to stalls 1 or 2. Not surprisingly A blind profit would have been made by backing both draws 1 and 2.

Over 6f low draws continue to have the advantage although there are far fewer 6f races per season at the course.

The extended 7f trip (7f122yds) sees a more even playing field in terms of the draw. Indeed low draws have actually performed marginally worse than middle / high draws in recent years.

Over 1m2f or more one would prefer to be drawn lower rather than high, but there is essentially not much in it.

Doncaster

Over 5f there used to be a strong high draw bias. High draws still have an edge although it is not as strong as in the past. The high draw bias though remains over 6f.

Over 7f there is often little in the draw, although when a big field lines up higher draws tend to come out best. Over 1m there used to be a low draw bias in big fields but more recently it seems you can win from anywhere, although you would still prefer to be close to either rail rather than a more central berth.

Over 1m2f on the round course low draws traditionally have been best.

Epsom

There have only been 9 handicaps with 10+ runners over 5f in the past four seasons and hence it is difficult to come to any concrete draw conclusions. Traditionally a higher draw has been preferred, but the recent stats indicate there is not much in it. The same limited data sample occurs over 6f, but low draws seem to have an edge here, which again has traditionally been the case.

Over 7f low to middle draws hold sway, but there seems to be little in the draw at distances of 1m114yds or more.

Goodwood

On the straight course (5/6f) middle to high draws have an advantage in big fields, but the bias is not as strong as it used to be. The big sprint at the course the Stewards Cup used to be totally dominated by high draws, but this has not been the case in the last two years.

Over 7f there used to be a very strong high draw bias but Goodwood spent most of 2008 moving the far rail meaning that the fastest strip of ground was not used. Indeed, in 2008, only two of the fifteen 7f races with 10+ runners were won by horses from double figure draws.

Over 1m it has been a similar story although the one race where a high draw bias continues to be strong is in the Totesport mile (formerly known as the Golden Mile). The race is run on the Friday of the Glorious 5 day meeting and the far rail is pushed back out to its old position.

Over 1m1f or more there is no draw bias.

Folkestone

Gone are the days of playing high draws on the straight course in soft or heavy ground. These days it pays to be drawn low over 5 and 6f, especially if you have early pace to grab the favoured rail. Over 7f there seems little in the draw, and this is also the case on the round course.

Hamilton

For many years there’s been a high draw bias on the straight course which strengthened in softer conditions.

Over 1m high draws have a slight advantage, while over 1m1f the high draw bias seems stronger. Indeed 10 of the last 14 handicaps with 10+ runners over 1m1f have been won by the top third of the draw.

Haydock

On the straight course (5/6f) middle to high draws have a slight advantage. There are not many races over 7f, but low draws definitely have the edge. At 1m+ there is no draw bias.

Kempton

Over 5f there is a strong high draw bias with 20 of the 36 10+ runner handicaps to the end of 2012 going to the top third of the draw. Backing the highest drawn horse “blind” would have yielded a profit of £28.50 (ROI +79.2%. The three lowest drawn stalls have provided just 4 of the 36 winners. The bias is less strong at 6 and 7f but high draws still have a decent advantage at both distances.

Over 1m+ there is no significant draw bias.

Leicester

In general Leicester’s straight course is a fair test in terms of the draw, although occasionally one side does seem strongly favoured.

Over 1m on the round course middle to high draws seem to have a slight advantage. At 1m2f or more there is no draw bias.

Lingfield

Turf Course

High draws have had the advantage on the straight course (5-7f140yds) over the past few seasons.

On the round course there is no draw bias.

All-Weather Ciurse

Middle to low draws have a slight advantage over 5/6f but it is not particularly significant. Over 7f very low draws have statistically been at a slight disadvantage.

Over 1m+ there is no draw bias.

Mussleburgh

It is perceived that low draws have the advantage over 5f, but the recent draw statistics do not back this up. The perceived low draw bias is also supposed to strengthen on good to soft or softer. They do seem to perform better under such conditions, but any low draw bias is minimal.

On the round course over 7f/1m there can be a slight advantage to higher draws, and low draws do tend to struggle a little over the 1m trip.

Newbury

There are very few 10+ runner handicaps at Newbury each year and there seems little in the draw. Having said that, high draws have performed below par recently. There is nothing in the draw from 6f to 1m — races that are also run on the straight course, although as with many tracks you occasionally an unexplained draw bias. Indeed twice in the past 3 years there were 7f handicaps that saw the first three home drawn in the top three stalls. However, it seems more a course to look for outliers (horses that have run well from a poor draw).

On the round course there is no draw bias.

Newmarket

Rowley Mile Course

There can be a bias on the straight course, especially in big fields, but as with any wide straight track the bias is unpredictable. Also they have been known to move rails which can have an affect. Interesting the 2m2f Cesarewitch run in October usually gives high to middle draws the advantage. Of the last 16 winners, 14 were drawn 15 or higher.

July Course

The July course is divided into two and hence they vary which straight part of the course they race on. In recent years there has been very little in the draw. Some years ago, especially at the July meeting, high draws occasionally had a significant advantage. It is a course worth keeping an eye on as if a bias does appear at the start of the meeting it could pay dividends if you are quick to notice it.

Newcastle

Low numbers are best on the straight course in soft or heavy ground.

Nottingham

Over 5f , low draws had the best of it, and over the past four seasons low draws have definitely had the advantage in soft / heavy ground.

Over 6f there’s not too much in the draw and overall this extra furlong seems to balance things out. Occasionally individual meetings can have a strong rail bias and if there is more than one sprint on the card then you should be able to take advantage of it in later races.

Over 1m very high draws are at a slight disadvantage, especially when the field size gets to 15 or more. There is no draw bias at longer distances.

Pontefract

Over 5f low draws tend to have a slight advantage on fast ground. However, it is rarely a very strong bias. Quite often over 6f very low draws go off too quickly and fail to last home on this stiff track. On good to soft or softer going, especially over 6f higher draws can have an advantage especially the wider they race in the straight.

Over 1m low draws have a slight advantage over middle draws that in turn have a slight advantage over higher draws. In the fifty one handicaps with 10+ runners in the past four seasons 13 were won by one of the two lowest drawn horses.

Over 1m2f or more there is no draw bias.

Redcar

The straight course sees races from 5f to 1m and generally the runner tend to run down the centre of the course rather than against either rail. Hence middle draws can have a slight edge, more especially over 5 and 6f. However, any bias is minimal. Over 7f and 1m you can win from any draw position and it is rare for a race, let alone a meeting to display anything significant in terms of draw bias.

There is no draw bias on the round course.

Ripon

Over 5 and 6f in very big fields it normally pays to be drawn close to either rail, although unusually in 2008 middle draws more than held their own. The usual rule of thumb is that on good to firm ground you want to be drawn low, while on good to soft or softer you want to be drawn high. The big sprint at the course is the 6f Great St Wilfrid and twice in the past four years very high draws have totally dominated.

Over 1m high draws have a decent advantage especially in big fields. There is no draw bias at longer distances.

Salisbury

There are very few handicaps over 5f at Salisbury but when there are it usually pays to be drawn high near to the far rail. Having said that it probably more down to pace than draw, as over 6f-1m there tends to be little in the draw.

There is no draw bias at longer distances of 1m2f+.

Sandown

In the mid 1990s the 5f trip was one of the most biased in the country in terms of the draw. High draws totally dominated. However, since then the bias has been far less evident and it is usually due to the far rail being moved inwards from time to time.

Over 7f and 1m low draws are a slight disadvantage but it is not insurmountable by any means. At 1m1f or more there is no draw bias.

Southwell

All-Weather

Over 5f on the straight course very high draws tend to be at a disadvantage. This is because they are often forced to rail under the near side rail where the ground is slower. From 6f upwards there is no draw bias.

Turf

There are very few race meetings on the turf course, but over 6 and 7f low draws do have a slight advantage.

Thirsk

High numbers are best in sprints on firm ground, but low numbers are favoured on good to soft or softer. Low numbers are just about best over 6f 216yds and a mile. Concentrate on the top four stalls over 5f on firm ground and the bottom four stalls on soft ground (14+ runners). Over 5f high draws have a significant advantage. If we look at the result of 10+ handicaps since 2012 we get the following draw split:

Top “third” of the draw: .
Middle “third” of the draw:
Bottom “third” of the draw:
Winning percentage 63.3 16.7 20

Placed 1st, 2nd or 3rd percentage 60 17.8 22.2

At present this C&D looks the most draw biased in the country. Interestingly the bias is far less strong over 6f, although a high draw is generally preferable. In the past three seasons the bigger the field, the bigger the edge to higher draws over 6f. One point worth noting however, is although soft ground is rare, when it is genuinely soft, low draws become much more competitive and sometimes have the upper hand when the field is stretched right across the track.

Over 7f there is a perceived 7f bias, but generally you can win from anywhere. There is no draw bias at 1m or further.

Warwick

Low draws have the advantage over 5f, 5½f and 6f, with the bias seemingly stronger over 6.

Over 7f and 1m low draws continue to hold the advantage, and draw 1 has a particular good record in 10+ runner handicaps (8 wins from 44).

Over 1m3f the low draw bias seems very strong and again draw 1 has proved very successful with 7 wins from 27 in 10+ runner handicaps.

Windsor

In recent years the course has seen numerous rail movements and essentially there is nothing in the draw on good or firmer ground over 5/6f. However, on good to soft or softer low draws often have the edge as they swing wide and end up against the far rail. Over 1m or further there is no draw bias.

Wolverhampton

Over 5f low draws have traditionally had the advantage and although it may not be as strong as it used to be, you would definitely prefer a low draw over a high one. Over 6f, once again a lower draw is preferable but the advantage is slight. Over 7f or further there is no draw bias.

Yarmouth

On the straight course there is usually little in the draw, although in 2008 over the two sprint trips (5/6f) high draws seemed to have the edge. It is worth keeping an eye on early next season to see if that trend continues. On the round course there is no draw bias.

York

On the straight course over 5/6f they tend to race down the middle steering clear of either rail. Middle draws seem to have a very slight edge over 6f, but it is not that significant. On the round course low draws have a slight edge at all distances up to 1m4f, although it seems at its strongest at 1m. This bias over 1m becomes stronger on good to firm ground.

IRISH

Ballinrobe

Most of the handicaps over 6f see 15 or 16 runners line up, but they have not raced over this trip for the past two seasons. In these big field handicaps middle to high draws have a definite advantage. Over 1m1f it is possible to win from any draw position. There is no draw bias over 1m4f and further.

Bellewstown

There have been only 24 races over 5f over the past four seasons. Of these, 19 of them have had 10 or more runners, and the lowest four draws have combined to win just one race between them. This may come as a surprise as the 5f trip at Bellewstown turns left-handed with around 2f to go. Over 5f it seems that middle to high draws actually have the advantage, and it does pay to race up with or close to the pace.

Over 1 mile low draws do seem to hold the advantage. Draw 1 has a particularly good record in 10+ runner handicaps registering 6 wins from the 26 races over the past four seasons. Backing all horses drawn in the lowest stall in these races would have produced a profit of £17.50 to £1 level stakes (ROI +67.3%). There is no draw bias over 1m4f and further.

Cork

Over the two sprint trips there seems very little in the draw. However, at 7f there is a strong bias with high draws having a definite advantage. In the past four seasons there have been 15 handicap races with 10 or more runners over 7f and draws 1 to 4 have failed to win a race between them.

From 1m to 1m2f low draws continue to struggle as high to middle draws have an advantage. There is no draw bias over 1m4f and further.

Curragh

The sprint track sees races over 5 and 6f — it is a wide track and high draws tend to tack over to the centre, while low draws stay up the near side rail. 6f races tend to have very big fields — usually over 20 with the maximum number being 30. There seems to be no consistent draw bias over the two sprint trips, but occasionally one part of the draw is favoured over the other.

For punters who like the straight forecast bet, then it may be worth considering perming the three highest draws in 6f handicaps of 10 or more runners.

On the round course over 7f there has not been a noticeable draw bias in recent years, although over 1m high draws do seem to have a slight advantage. The slight advantage to high draws is evident also at 1m2f. Handicaps over 1m4f also have shown a very slight edge to higher draws.

Down Royal

Over 5f high to middle draws have the advantage. This is perhaps no surprise as higher draws drawn next to the inside rail. The 5f trip turns quite sharply right around two furlongs from home which further helps higher draws. Over 7f a similar draw bias exists, there is no draw bias over 1m2f and further.

Downpatrick

The shortest distance at the course is 1m3f and at this distance and further there appears to be no draw bias.

Dundalk

Over 5f low to middle draws seem to hold a slight advantage, while over 6f the stats suggest the bias to low draws is stronger. Around 50{70aeb3532cb26dbe277d25ea128ebb74de84b9bd22e1583b0eb1b73768e061f6} of 10+ runner 6f handicaps have been won by the bottom third of the draw. Over 7f there seems to be no advantage in the draw, while at 1m low draws statistically have a very small edge. There is no draw bias over 1m3f and further.

Fairyhouse

Over 6f there is occasionally a high draw bias . The high draw bias has traditionally been at its strongest on yielding or softer going. There have only been five 10+ runner handicaps on this type of ground in the past four years, but 10 of the 15 top three positions have been secured by high draws.

Over 7f high draws once again have the edge. 15 of the 21 races with 10+ runners were won by horses drawn in a double figure stall. Once again it looks that this bias becomes slightly stronger on easy ground. Over 1m1f and 1m2f, low draws again struggle and a middle to high berth has been a definite advantage in recent years. There is no draw bias over 1m4f and further.

Galway

There are a good number of races over 7f over a season and the draw stats point to a middle to high draw bias. In 10+ runner handicaps the top five stalls have provided 13 wins compared with 5 wins for the bottom five stalls.

Over 1m, the stats seem to suggest the bias evens out, however the 1m4f trip has seen low draws really struggle in recent years. Whether this is simply an anomaly or not it is difficult to say. There is no draw bias over 1m6f and further.

Gowran

A few years ago over 7f low draws did best on faster ground, while high draws did best on softer. However, there seems little in the draw these days at this distance. Indeed overall it is course that offers no real draw bias at any distance.

Killarney

There are no races over sprint trips at Killarney and there is no draw bias at any of the trips of 1m+.

Spread Betting

In traditional fixed odds betting there are usually just two outcomes to worry about:
a) You are right and you win your stake multiplied by the odds. Good!
b) You are wrong and you lose your stake. Bad!

But in spread betting there are varying degrees of being right or wrong and the more right you are the more you win. Conversely, the more wrong you are the more you lose.

Say the bookmakers offer 4/5 about Manchester United beating Arsenal at Old Trafford. Your best mate works as groundsman at The Emirates and knows that the first choice  Arsenal goalkeeper has the flu, the second choice keeper is injured and the 16yo youth keeper will make his senior debut tonight. Obviously, you think Man Utd are going to thrash them in a goal fest so you stake £100. It doesn’t matter if they win 1-0, 2-0 or 9-0 though you will always get paid out £180 and win £80 for your bet. Fair enough, you knew right from placing your wager that was going to be the case. You either win £80 or lose your £100. The ease of their victory is irrelevant.

But what if you could bet on how easily Manchester United would beat Arsenal and get paid out more and more for every goal they score? This is where spread betting steps in.

By either buying or selling on the bookmakers spread we can do just that…

WHAT IS A SPREAD?

The spread is simply a range of results that the bookmaker’s traders think will be the most likely outcome in any specific event. In our example this may be number of goals Man Utd score in the match.

The traders may think the most likely number of goals Man Utd will score in this match will be 2 but that’s a little precise and there is no room for error so the traders build a safety margin into the spread. They give themselves a bit of leeway by creating a gap around their result which is usually around 2-10% and is much like the over-round in a standard betting market (the smaller the margin the better it is for the punter). It would be written as 2 numbers separated by a hyphen. So instead of having a spread of 2 they would make it say 1.5 – 2.5.

The traders are working with the same information as everyone else and their opening spread, much like in fixed odds betting, is based simply on their opinion. Once the spread is announced the same market forces that operate in fixed odds betting will get to work and move the spread backwards or forwards depending on where the money is being wagered.

Once the spread has been set it is then up to the punter to either buy or sell…..

BUYING AND SELLING

Once the spread is set you must decide whether you think the outcome will be bigger or smaller than the market suggests. If you think the outcome is going to be bigger then you will want to BUY and conversely you would SELL if you think the outcome will be smaller. Buyers use the higher number of the spread and sellers use the lower one.

If we stick with our example of 1.5-2.5 goals in the Man Utd vs Arsenal match we obviously think there will be a lot of goals so we would buy. As we are buying we use the top figure (2.5) and stake our £100. For every goal Man Utd score over 2.5 we will now win £100.

So the following outcomes may occur…

Your mates inside information is spot on and Man Utd win 8-0. You win £550 (8-2.5 x 100)
Your mates inside information is spot on but the young keeper plays a blinder and Man Utd only manage a 3-1 win. You win £50 (3-2.5 x 100)
Your mates inside information is a load of rubbish, Arsenal play their first choice keeper and Man Utd lose 1-0. You lose £250. (0-2.5 x 100)

As you can see from just these three examples there is a lot of volatility in Spread Betting!

One of the advantages of buying in a spread is that you know exactly how much your maximum losses will be. In our example we know that Man Utd cannot score a minus number of goals so the least they will score is 0 making our maximum loss £250. But our maximum make-up can be many times our stake depending on just how many goals Man Utd can score. Exciting stuff!

Now say you didn’t have a mate who worked as groundsman at the Emirates and you’re a lifelong Arsenal fan who would never dream of backing Man Utd to win. You know you have the best goalkeeper in the premiership and Man Utd will do well to score.

So you sell the Man Utd goals on the spread for £100 (at the lower number 1.5).

In this case the following outcomes may occur…….

Arsenal reveal 5 minutes before the match that their number 1 and number 2 choice goalkeepers are out injured and they are forced to play a 16yo in goal. Man Utd win 8-0. You now lose £650 (1.5-8 x 100)
The 16yo keeper plays well and Man Utd only manage to win 3-1. You lose £150 (1.5-3 x 100)
The rumours about Arsenal goalkeepers prove groundless and in a thrilling match Arsenal win 1-0. You win £150 (1.5-0 x 100).

Now you can see just how dangerous selling on a spread can be. We knew in our example that the maximum we were ever going to win was £150 but our losses could have been catastrophic with no real limit on how many goals Man Utd could have scored. Read a market wrong and you can end up losing a lot of money. Imagine something like the number of runs in a cricket innings. Sell at 250 and a side scores 600+, it’s not going to be a good day!

That’s not to say selling is always a bad idea. Buying is always more popular in the markets with less people selling so sometimes there is value to be had in the lower end of the spread but I would advise sticking with buying when you first start out!

ADVANTAGES TO SPREAD BETTING

As we have seen the main advantage spread betting has over it’s fixed odds counterpart is that the more correct you are the more you are rewarded.

Another advantage with spread betting is that once an event has started the spread doesn’t disappear or simply stay the same it moves depending on how that particular market is performing. This market movement makes it possible to adjust your position and gives you an opportunity to trade out either to guarantee a profit or limit your losses. Obviously the more you get it wrong to begin with the more you’ll end up losing and the earlier you get it right the more profit you can lock in.

There are usually a lot more markets available to wager on with Spread Betting as there are countless options available to the traders. In a simple football match you can bet on number of goals scored, time of the goals, corners, throw ins, shirt numbers, substitutes used etc. and all have differing ranges of ‘correctness’. Some of these markets offer a lot of value and offer the chance of big wins for small downsides and with every sport imaginable having multiple markets on them as well as stocks, currency and financial spreads available the betting opportunities are enormous.

Obviously the more markets that are on offer the bigger the chance of the traders making a mistake. They can’t know everything and if you specialise in a certain area or have a mate who works as groundskeeper at The Emirates and shares information with you then you have an immediate advantage. Once the markets are released the traders are then relying on market forces to re-adjust their spreads. Much as in fixed odds betting, going against the general consensus can often prove a profitable strategy.

BUT BEWARE!

It is possible to lose a lot of money very quickly when spread betting and you can lose much more than your original stake. Be aware that a £100 stake does not necessarily mean you will only lose £100, It could be many multiples of this amount. It’s always best to imagine the worst case scenario and work out the most you can lose on any market BEFORE placing your trade.

Always Back Winners Sports & Gaming Tips

Always Back Winners. All rights reserved. always-back-winners.com does not provide gaming or gambling services on this site. It is a sports information website. While odds and betting tips are part of the information do not forget to check the laws and regulation in your own country to find if you are allowed to bet online, as the laws differ from country to country.

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